Beliefs & Values

BELIEFS about PATIENT CARE

People are doing the best they can at any given time, within their unique circumstances. Change can take a very long time and we must always respect the person and their process.

Violence, abuse, exploitation, and trauma, like pain, is what the patient says it is.

People need to be considered the experts of their lives and their circumstances.

A kind word spoken at a difficult time can be incredibly powerful; we cannot underestimate the impact of seemingly small gestures like listening, being present, or an encouraging word.

Violence, abuse, and exploitation are not isolated social issues; they are issues fundamental to human rights and to the lifelong health and well-being that each and every person deserves and was created to enjoy.

Helping patients identify strengths within their lives creates HOPE, is empowering and helps improve long-term health. Conversely, creating reliance on a particular healthcare professional or any system is harmful because it furthers oppression and is not sustainable.

BELIEFS about HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS and SYSTEMS

Violence is extremely costly-to individuals, to healthcare systems and to communities.

Healthcare professionals and systems want to do what is best for patients and have the necessary skills but often lack the infrastructure, support, and training to be effective.

Healthcare professionals can and should have meaningful interactions with patients acknowledging the potential for violence before there is a patient disclosure; if we wait for a disclosure, we will miss the opportunity to give needed resources to those at risk, BEFORE violence begins.

Healthcare professionals have a valuable and unique role, different from law enforcement and different from advocacy. In order to be effective and ethical, this unique role must be maintained.

Consent, confidentiality and mandatory reporting are different concepts that can be confusing; understanding how these are different is legally critical for organizations and has huge ethical implications for delivering compassionate and competent patient care.

Trends of violence seen by healthcare professionals can and should help inform anti-violence work in the community; healthcare professionals should be included as valuable members of all multidisciplinary efforts.

CORE ORGANIZATIONAL VALUES

HOPE & COURAGE
to persevere and never give up

CREATIVITY & EXCELLENCE
daring to envision what has never been done before

ADAPTABILITY & ACCOUNTABILITY
to meet the ever-changing needs of our clients, our systems and our communities

JUSTICE & EQUITY
in our relationships with all people, for all people

COMPASSION & HONESTY
trustworthiness at every intersection and in every partnership

COLLABORATION & HUMILITY
with others knowing that we are a part of something greater

multicultural hearts and hands

HOPE

at the
intersection
of health
and violence

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